John & Janet McKenzie’s Golden Wedding Anniversary 30th June 1904

John & Janet McKenzie’s Golden Wedding Anniversary 30th June 1904

The Queenslander of 9th July 1904 reported “…A very pleasant gathering took place at the Upper North Pine on Thursday last, the object being the celebration of the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. John McKenzie,  Besides friends, the whole of the descendants were present, including five daughters, three sons, and forty grandchildren.  Mr. McKenzie is 76 years of age and his wife is six years his junior.  The old couple are both hale and hearty, and have resided at the Upper North Pine about thirty-nine years being residents before the Free Selection Land Act was passed in the latter sixties.  Mr. McKenzie started pit-sawing cedar and beech in the then virgin scrub, further up the river than his present home.  His hobby was the study of the habits and haunts of animals and birds.  In time Mr. McKenzie became a clever taxidermist, and added greatly to his income by selling cases of stuffed birds and animals.  The old gentleman was no mean performer on the violin, and the early settlers will never forget the pleasant hours they spent in the slab-floored barns, dancing to the pleasing music of the old gentleman’s fiddle.”

John and Janet McKenzie and their young family were the first non-indigenous settlers in the Dayboro district, settling on the banks of the North Pine River in an area known as Fishery Pocket (now Armstrong Creek).  A number of descendants still live in the district.